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Recent Elastography

Grants Support Breast Cancer Diagnosis, Management Research

Creating new imaging techniques to aid in the diagnosis and management of breast cancer and lymphedema are the goals of two new grants awarded to Dr. Jonathan Ophir, professor of diagnostic and interventional imaging and director of the Ultrasonics and Elastrographics Laboratory at the Medical School.

By Darla Brown,
Medical School


New Imaging Technology Deciphers Tumors
Measuring tissue elasticity may reduce the need for some biopsies

By Darla Brown,
Medical School

What if an image could tell if a breast tumor were malignant or benign?Today a biopsy is needed to make such a determination; but tomorrow, elastography may provide the answer in a gentle, noninvasive way.   (see complete story) 
 

Images  from
Benign in vivo breast tumor (fibroadenoma)

Elisa Konofagou, Brian Garra, and Jonathan Ophir

University of Texas Medical School, Department of Radiology, Ultrasonics Laboratory

6431 Fannin St., Houston, Texas 77030

Email: Elisa Konofagou, PhD

Slide #1

Slide #2
 

Images  from

Elastographic Imaging of the Normal Canine Prostate In-vitro

Faouzi Kallel, Roger E. Price, Elisa Konofagou, and Jonathan Ophir

University of Texas Medical School, Department of Radiology, Ultrasonics Laboratory

6431 Fannin St., Houston, Texas 77030

The University of Texas, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery,

1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030

E-mail: Faouzi.Kallel@uth.tmc.edu

Figure 4
Matching elastograms and sonograms obtained from 1 mm equally spaced parallel transverse cross-sections of a typical canine prostate. The first elastogram (top, left) was obtained near the apex. This prostate is around 3x3x3 cm3. The elastograms were obtained for an applied strain of 1% using a single compression. The elastogram is displayed using a reversed gray-scale map where bright means stiff (strain close to zero) and dark means soft (strain close to 3%). Note the urethra (u), verumontanum (v), and median sulcus (ms). All the elastogram are displayed using the same strain dynamic range of 0-3%. Notice that in each elastogram the noisy strain inside the clear gel was blanked. The blanking of noisy strain in the gel was applied to each elastogram shown in this paper except for the elastograms of figure I1. A 2x2 median filter was applied to every elastogram. The elastograms are slightly wider than the corresponding sonograms due to the previously described "night-vision" effect. Note that the sonograms were obtained from digitized raw RF signals and no post-processing had been applied to them.
 
Figure 5
Matching elastograms and sonograms obtained from 0.5 mm equally spaced sagittal sections from the prostate of the figure above.
Figure 9A
Figure 9B
Matching elastograms and tissue-photographs obtained from parallel transverse cross-sections of a typical canine prostate. The first elastogram (top, left) was obtained near the base. This prostate is around 4x3x3 cm3. The elastograms were obtained for an applied strain of 1%. The elastogram is displayed using a reversed gray-scale map where bright means stiff (strain close to zero) and dark means soft (strain close to 3%). All the elastogram are displayed using the same dynamic range of 0-3%. %. Top = ventral. Verumontanum (arrows), and muscular prostatic sphincter (arrowheads) are illustrated.
 

 

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